DIY: Make Your Own Fiber Rainbow Pin for Saint Patrick’s Day

Saint Patrick’s Day is a weird holiday, right? It started as a celebration of the day that Saint Patrick drove the snakes out of Ireland, so obviously we celebrate it by wearing green, pinching people, drinking beer, and eating chocolate coins? Bizarre.

And of all of these things, the pinching really pisses me off. I think it’s mostly stems from the childhood horrors of being pinched (because what adult pinches another adult these days?), but it makes me so angry. And what do you do if you just aren’t a green person? Try to wear a teal shirt and hope that people give you the benefit of the doubt?

This year I took matters (and fibers) into my own hands and came up with a trendy and modern way to celebrate the holiday.

I’ve seen those beautiful rope rainbow wall hangings popping up everywhere so I tried my hand at a mini-version to wear as a pin! I prefer the rainbow aesthetic of St. Patrick’s Day over the clover aesthetic, so this was a great way to save myself from the pinch-monster trauma.

You will need:

  • 0.1 inch Macrame cotton cord
  • embroidery thread (at least one should be green!)
    • I used DMC 3847, DMC 728, DMC 704, and DMC603
  • Wire that’s fairly bendable
  • Wire cutters
  • Needle (I used an embroidery needle)
  • Pin backing
Make Your Own Fiber Rainbow Pin

STEP 1:

Fold your rope/cord so that it is the shape of a rainbow and the size you want for a pin. I would suggest trying to be about 2.5 inches by 2.5 inches

Make Your Own Fiber Rainbow Pin

STEP 2:

Cut the loops at the bottom of the rainbow to create separate pieces

STEP 3:

Take a pen and make marks on both ends of each piece of rope so that you have an idea of where you want your thread to start and end.

STEP 4:

Take your first thread color and tie a knot at the end of one piece of rope, right on top of your pen mark. Now carefully wrap the rope so that the thread fully covers it. It’s easier to hold the rope between your thumb and first two fingers and twist that around, rather than wrapping the thread in a circle. When you get to the end mark, tie 2 knots to secure. Repeat with your next size rope and next thread color.

Make Your Own Fiber Rainbow Pin

STEP 5:

For your 2nd biggest piece of rope, add the wire to hold the rainbow shape. Form the wire into the shape you will want for the final piece. Tie your next thread on your marked spot, and this time, when wrapping your thread, include the wire. For this one, it is easier to hold the rope and wire in place and slowly wrap the thread around to make sure the wire stays exactly where you want it. Secure at the ends with knots.

STEP 6:

Wrap your last rope as you did in step 4.

Make Your Own Fiber Rainbow Pin

STEP 7:

Using leftover thread, cut thread to about 3 feet. Pull out one strand of thread and thread your needle. Bring both ends of the thread together and tie a knot to secure. Starting with the biggest piece of rope, slowly zig zag stitch your big piece and your wire piece together. Continue doing this with the next smaller piece, and then the smallest piece. Secure at the end with a knot.

Note: This is also where you can clean up any loose threads. Trim them down and stitch loose threads against the side. This is the backside so it’s okay if it’s a little messy.

Make Your Own Fiber Rainbow Pin

STEP 8:

Using your needle, tug at the edges of your rope to fray the ends.

Make Your Own Fiber Rainbow Pin

STEP 9:

Re-thread your needle with more leftover thread and knot the ends. Stitch the pin backing to the middle of your rainbow. I went over and over and all around and continued knotting throughout to make sure it was secure. It doesn’t have to be pretty, it’s the back!

Make Your Own Fiber Rainbow Pin

And that’s it! You’ve got yourself a piece of stylish wearable fiber art! It will save you from pinches and I personally think is cute enough to wear all year round.

Make Your Own Fiber Rainbow Pin

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